Keep Moving Forward

Better to have a short life that is full of what you like doing, than a long life spent in a miserable way. -Alan Watts

254 notes

fastcompany:

One suggestion is to turn the Amazonian stadium into a giant jail. But two architects have a more positive idea: Why not convert part of the old stadiums into much-needed housing?
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fastcompany:

One suggestion is to turn the Amazonian stadium into a giant jail. But two architects have a more positive idea: Why not convert part of the old stadiums into much-needed housing?

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60,181 notes

shaefierce:

Counting down Scotland to six weeks now. Hope my photographs are anything close to this beautiful. Finally shipped my friend in Montana back her pro camera and after much deliberation over the Iceland outtakes, I have decided to jump into the deep end and buy my own pro pack for travel photography. Thinking a Mark III. I can’t just up and skip off to Scotland without one, now can I? No. The home in the first image is basically my dream home. I might not come back to the States. I might leave my life for that of a Scottish rancher instead.

(Source: instagram.com, via preppycollegeguy)

554 notes

fastcodesign:

Kids who could identify golden arches and other junk food logos had higher BMIs than their brand-ignorant peers, researchers found.
A new study shows that young children who are familiar with unhealthy food branding—McDonald’s golden arches, Trix’s silly rabbit, Burger King’s crown—are more likely to be overweight than their brand-ignorant peers. Studies show that people who are overweight in childhood tend to stay that way. 

The researchers tested two groups of three- to five-year-olds on their knowledge of fast food and processed food brands like McDonald’s, Burger King, Coke, Pepsi, Fritos, and Doritos. They found that those who could correctly identify the sugar-and-grease-mongering logos tended to have higher body mass indexes (BMIs). “We found the relationship between brand knowledge and BMI to be quite robust,” said Anna McAlister, an MSU assistant professor of advertising and public relations who was a member of the research team.
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fastcodesign:

Kids who could identify golden arches and other junk food logos had higher BMIs than their brand-ignorant peers, researchers found.

A new study shows that young children who are familiar with unhealthy food branding—McDonald’s golden arches, Trix’s silly rabbit, Burger King’s crown—are more likely to be overweight than their brand-ignorant peers. Studies show that people who are overweight in childhood tend to stay that way

image

The researchers tested two groups of three- to five-year-olds on their knowledge of fast food and processed food brands like McDonald’s, Burger King, Coke, Pepsi, Fritos, and Doritos. They found that those who could correctly identify the sugar-and-grease-mongering logos tended to have higher body mass indexes (BMIs). “We found the relationship between brand knowledge and BMI to be quite robust,” said Anna McAlister, an MSU assistant professor of advertising and public relations who was a member of the research team.

Read More>

(via fastcompany)